Not every site needs an FAQ section, though if you’re selling something, providing a service, or giving information about a complex subject, an FAQ can make life much easier for your visitors.

There’s no “right” design method for delivering FAQs, but any way you shape it, FAQs are content, and content is king. You must be sure the content you’re presenting is efficient and effective.

Bad FAQs

  • have outdated information
  • answer nothing
  • are not organized
  • take the user through circular links
  • are recycled information from the sit

Good FAQs

  • answer questions your customers are really asking. If you have a customer service department, support center or call center, find out what questions they regularly answer.
  • include timely questions. Are you answering the same questions today as you were last year? Maybe there is an issue there to be fixed.
  • are straightforward in their answers and clear in their expression.
  • resist the temptation to use marketing-speak. Customers want answers to a question, not a commercial.
  • are professionally written. Nothing turns off  customers faster than getting a techno-geek answer when what they need is well-written, plain-language instructions.
  • are easy to find and search.
  • are referenced throughout your site.
Posted
Authorbob namar