Content marketing can help you create awareness, build your brand and establish credibility. Its purpose is to attract and retain customers by consistently creating and curating relevant and valuable content. It is an ongoing process that is best integrated into your overall marketing strategy. Here are 25 more things you need to know about content marketing:

  1. Content marketing is a marathon, not a sprint.
  2. Content marketing costs 62% less than traditional marketing and generates about 3 times as many leads.
  3. If your content is irrelevant to your customers, it might as well be invisible. 
  4. 90% of consumers find custom content useful.
  5. 57% of respondents said quality content is their most effective SEO tactic; keyword research/mgmt next highest (46%).
  6. Three biggest complaints of B2B buyers regarding content are: 1) too many requirements to download; 2) too promotional, self-serving; 3) non-substantive, uninformed.
  7. Over half (57%) of millionaires surveyed use Facebook; 41% use LinkedIn, says Spectrum Group survey of 13k millionaires. 
  8. The most valuable content marketing efforts are collaborative, & draw on strengths from marketing, sales & customers. 
  9. Nostalgia can make users more likely to share.
  10. Surveys show that nearly half of all Millennials don't trust branded content.
  11. 50% of consumer time online is spent engaging with custom #content.
  12. Never use a photograph without putting a caption under. On average, 2X as many people read captions as body copy.
  13. The best content marketers are crowd-sourcing from within their organization.
  14. Respect the 4C's of digital marketing: Creating, Curating, Connecting, Culture.
  15. Art is content. Every Trader Joe's has its own in-house artist. What could an artist do to increase interest for your business? 
  16. Blogs give websites on average 434% more indexed pages and 97% more indexed links.
  17. Powerful headlines help your readers imagine a better life.
  18. Outsource your content to get quick turnaround. Content marketers deliver good-quality work in a short time; meet any deadline.
  19. Identify what topics you can own and create the best pages on the Internet for that topic. 
  20. Quality content helps build a community of advocates.
  21. If you don't have enough resources for a steady stream of newly created content, re-purposing is great way to keep it flowing.
  22. Make content that prospects/customers can learn from quickly and share with their friends
  23. Consumers far more likely to choose brands that engage their interests than to select those that only urge them to buy.
  24.  27,000,000 pieces of content are shared each day.
  25. Only 1 out of 5 readers gets beyond your headline.

 

________________________________________________________________________

Bob Namar is the Namarketer, a professional writer, editor and Internet marketer providing promotions and marketing via custom content and social media to businesses nationally and internationally.

 
Namarketer.comLogo.jpg
Posted
Authorbob namar

Xenolith means, literally, “foreign rock”. It comes from the Greek  “xenos” (foreign) and “lithos” (stone). A xenolith is a fragment of foreign rock within a host rock. And just like that piece of foreign rock within, you may be overlooking a small, but enormously important bit as you use continue to hammer away with that stone tool to market yourself through your conventional ads, flyers, PowerPoint slides and other pedantic pieces of public promotion.

Video. 

You say you've gotten along without video so far?  You say the current mix of tools has been doing ok? 

Well, maybe but....  

 

CRUSH KILL DESTROY

xenolithic1 copy.jpg
You should know that video crushes conventional ads. It murders email. It petrifies postcards and eviscerates Val-Pak. It's been called the ‘Ultimate Marketing Tool’ by some experts. Little wonder why:

It is here to stay. Words with pictures. People talking to you. It's primal, and effective. YouTube tracks on average 2 billion views each day.

It is cost effective. You don't need a production team or even a high-end camera to produce your videos. Believe it or not, your iPhone or something similar will do. 

It is sought after. The market, yes even your market for niche b2b widgets, is eating up video at a record pace. Show Me. Tell Me. Show Me. 

Video brings traffic.  Create your channel on YouTube. Post videos regularly. Create a demand for more. Joila! 

It's the new cost of doing business. Not doing video is on par with not having a website...or a phone number.

Maybe your competition hasn't jumped on the video bandwagon yet. Perfect time to become a leader in your industry.  

By incorporating video into your campaign--xenolithically-- you will not only stay ahead of your competition, but you are likely to see improvements in your bottom line.

If video has been the foreign fragment in your stone, get to know it. And Rock It.  

__________________________________________________

Bob Namar is the Namarketer, a professional writer, editor and Internet marketer providing promotions and marketing via custom content to businesses in New York and New Jersey and internationally.

 

Posted
Authorbob namar

Cause marketing has long been another tool in the work belt of advertising and public relations professionals. Everything from Breast Cancer Awareness to Crone's Disease has been co-opted and utilized as a marketing ploy to get consumers to buy, switch, or upgrade, just to build a brand. 

So much helping-hands-to-help-me is prevalent that there is more than a serious risk that we have desensitized consumers to helping a good cause for good, just because.

There is another way. Perhaps a brand could make a real impact by embracing the cause in 'cause marketing' and letting the marketing follow. I know it is revolutionary and contrary to modern marketing concepts, but think about it. You gotta zag when the others are zigging.

Imagine a company-corporation-business just doing the right thing. Helping for the sake of providing help; doing good works. And when the consumer tries to look behind the curtain for the motive? "Just doing good here.". Then you let your brand journalists loose to report on it for you. But no gimmicks; no 'a portion of every sale up to a preset amount we have already budgeted and paid goes to the cause'; no 'just buy our specially tagged-colored-packaged item at an inflated price and show your friends you cared enough about a cause to buy our product instead of helping the cause directly on your own'. Nope. None of that. Give it up. Stop being so convoluted.

Just help.

OK, I'll go... In my part of the world there is an historic piece of architecture --the Kirkbride Building--what had been a main building at the closed Greystone Park Psychiatric Hospital in Parsippany, NJ.

 

greystone.GIF

Designed a few years after the Civil War by Philadelphia architect Samuel Sloan, it is a French Renaissance/Second Empire style building.  In the 1800s, Dr. Kirkbride for whom it was named, was seeking to create benevolent settings for patients. Every window in the Sloan design had a view of the surrounding pastoral countryside.

Sloan was no one-hit wonder. He also designed the North Carolina Executive Mansion, the official residence of the Governor of North Carolina and family, and the The Asa Packer Mansion, home of railroad magnate and founder of Lehigh University.  

Everything old is new again must be demolished

The 678,000-square-foot Kirkbride Building, constructed in 1876 and closed in 2008 when a new, modern hospital opened nearby is slated for demolition by the state (Governor Christie). Meanwhile Preserve Greystone (preservegreystone.org) -- made up of preservationists, historians, environmentalists and interested local residents-- is trying to salvage it; not as an empty monument. They are working to put it in the hands of people who could create something out of it-- new uses for the building instead of demolition of a storied piece of the state's history

Richard Upjohn, a Sloan contemporary and then president of the Institute of Architects mourned back in the 1800s that so few early colonial buildings remained and that if the Institute should be able by its influence to preserve these kind of  "interesting fabrics from demolition, it will be doing a good work."

On the destruction of a great building back in the 1870s, Sloan wrote: "Architecture and the art of building have not arrived at so much perfection in America that the loss of such an example can be afforded..."  

Preserve Greystone (preservegreystone.org) is dedicated to protecting the open space and historic buildings on the former Greystone Park Psychiatric Hospital property in Morris County, NJ.   Please consider signing the petition on their website to keep it in our midst. You'll be doing good.

Marketing with content more often than not requires a reliance on words, (pictures can rarely tell the whole story) and certain words are more powerful than others when it come to helping attract attention, drive sales, or deliver a message. There are thousands to choose from, but here are six tried and true, powerful words to wake up, or flag your content.

because
now
free
how

(ok, so that was really two words)

new

Here's how to make your business successful. Use these pathfinders as an easy way to alert your prospects and customers, divine new content, or refresh previously published material. Because they are worth your time and effort. Act now. They're free.

__________________________________________________

Bob Namar is the Namarketer, a professional writer, editor and Internet marketer providing promotions and marketing via custom content to businesses in New York and New Jersey.

QUALITY. It's the buzzword we all chase, for our businesses, for our clients or customers, and for our personal lives. But what is quality?

image

It is sometimes called 'excellence' or 'merit' or something else clever that the company is using to communicate they are "better than" somebody else. But it is usually a false chase. What quality is not is perfection. Too many minds get caught up in the 'it's got to be perfect to please, to work, to serve'. But it doesn't; because nothing is perfect.

But it can be free of mistakes; and it should be.

Namar on quality

So proofread that sales sheet three times over, then give it to someone else to proof, too. Double-check that list you are about to send to. Recheck those logos; are they the right color/size/shape? Is the copy saying what you really meant it to?...what you want it to?

Customers, clients, business partners may overlook an error; but they won't forget it. And repeating those errors is worse that being wrong, because it says you are being sloppy and uncaring about your relationship with them.

Quality is getting it as right as you can, consistently, confidently.

Go forth and make quality.

noerrors

Why is it that the best results for email are seen in the p.m., but the vast majority are sent in a.m.? Performance is everything. As a marketer, when you launch an email campaign, you try to focus on all the elements that could make it a success--or a failure: subject line. length, offer, creativity, images, and so on. One factor that usually gets the most attention is: When do we send?

email as social media

Conventional wisdom has long held that early in the day, when people are fresh and at work, is the best for performance (open rates and clickthroughs). But new research from Experian shows that while a.m. is by far the most popular time to send out that email, p.m. is better in terms of performance--far better. While performance will obvious vary by industry and other factors, in general, later--much later--is better. Between 8 p.m. and midnight, the open rate is more than 30% higher; and the clickthrough rate is almost 80% higher than their early-to-rise counterparts.

The reason? While open for debate, it seems rather straightforward that people have more time in the evening, to not only to spend time online, but to engage. The Internet, like a good nightclub, is a place to go for action after dark.

Namarketeers, take note.